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IOL implantation

Everything you need to know about our Company

Crystal clear vision After  IOL

Removes  cloudy lens and replaces it with a clear IOL to improve your vision .

An Intraocular lens(IOL) is the replacement lens that is surgically implanted in the eye to replace the existing natural clouded lens used for cataract surgery traditionally the replacement lens used for cataract surgery was a monofocal IOL. this type of lens restored good functional distance vision but people still needed to continue reading glasses. Like our eye's natural lens, an IOL focuses light that comes into your eye through the cornea and pupil onto the retina, the sensitive tissue at the back of the eye that relays images through the optic nerve to the brain. Most IOLs are made of a flexible, foldable material and are about one-third of the size of a dime.  Like the lenses of prescription eyeglasses, your IOL will contain the appropriate prescription to give you the best vision possible. Read below to learn about how IOL types correct specific vision problems.

 Which lens option is right 
Before surgery your eyes are measured to determine your IOL prescription, and you and your Eye surgen compare options to decide which IOL type is best for you. The type of IOL implanted will affect how you see when not wearing eyeglasses. Glasses may still be needed by some people for some activities.
If you have astigmatism, your Eye M.D. will discuss toric IOLs and related treatment options with you.
In certain cases, cost may be a deciding factor for you if you have the option of selecting special premium lOLs that may reduce your need for glasses.
 

Types of IOL Lens

Monofocal lens

This common IOL type has been used for several decades. Monofocals are set to provide best corrected vision at near, intermediate or far distances. Most people who choose monofocals have their IOLs set for distance vision and use reading glasses for near activities. On the other hand, a person whose IOLs were set to correct near vision would need glasses to see distant objects clearly. Some who choose monofocals decide to have the IOL for one eye set for distance vision, and the other set for near vision, a strategy called "monovision." The brain adapts and synthesizes the information from both eyes to provide vision at intermediate distances. Often this reduces the need for reading glasses. People who regularly use computers, PDAs or other digital devices may find this especially useful. Individuals considering monovision may be able to try this technique with contact lenses first to see how well they can adapt to monovision. Those who require crisp, detailed vision may decide monovision is not for them. People with appropriate vision prescriptions may find that monovision allows them see well at most distances with little or no need for eyeglasses.

Multifocal or accommodative lenses
These newer IOL types reduce or eliminate the need for glasses or contact lenses. In the multifocal type, a series of focal zones or rings is designed into the IOL. Depending on where incoming light focuses through the zones, the person may be able to see both near and distant objects clearly.
   
Toric IOL 

This is a monofocal IOL with astigmatism correction built into the lens.

Astigmatism: This eye condition distorts or blurs the ability to see both near and distant objects. With astigmatism the cornea (the clear front window of the eye) is not round and smooth (like a basketball), but instead is curved like a football. People with significant degrees of astigmatism are usually most satisfied with toric IOLs.

People who want to reduce (or possibly eliminate) the need for eyeglasses may opt for an additional treatment called limbal relaxing incisions, which may be done at the same time as cataract surgery or separately. These small incisions allow the cornea's shape to be rounder or more symmetrical.